Lost Churches of Terracina. 2 of 5

Second appointment A Spasso con Sara to discover the lost churches of Terracina.

 

Our journey in the Christian and medieval Terracina continues.

As we saw at the beginning of this special series, the first Christian churches of Terracina are born in the area of La Valle, outside the town.

Their presence in the urban fabric is certain only between the 8th and 9th centuries AD. This was the period in which documents presuppose the existence of the Cathedral of San Cesareo, the most important church in the city. To it are then added new churches, born between the 11th and 12th centuries AD. (Romanic age) and the 13th and 14th centuries (Gothic age) A.D., phases in which Terracina was affected by profound historical, political and urban changes.

 

Detail of the decoration of the pulpit of the Cathedral of San Cesareo of Terracina (Credits: worldtourisminfo.com).

 

The fulcrum of this second chapter is the area of the Emilian Forum, the ancient square paved by the local magistrate Aulus Aemilius at the end of the 1st century BC.

 

Detail of the original paving of the Emilian Forum. You can still see the furrows of the bronze letters bearing the signature of the magistrate Aulus Aemilius who paid for the pavement of the square.

 

The life of this public space did not stop, in fact, with the fall of the Western Roman Empire (476 AD), but continued, under new forms, throughout the Middle Ages.

The landscape of the area changed. Tower houses, Romanic domus and Gothic style invade much of the paved forensic, whose free space narrows. Once the open side towards the sea has disappeared, Piazza San Cesareo – this is the new name taken from the square dominated by the Cathedral – is defined as a place closed in on itself.

 

The square of the ancient Emilian Forum in an engraving by L. Rossini (Credits: MR Coppola 1984).

S. Maria della Scala

And, in fact, right next to the current seat of the Municipality, there was S. Maria della Scala.

 

The area once occupied by Le Scalelle.

Located along Via delle Scalelle, from which it clearly derived its name, the church must have existed as early as the thirteenth century AD. The Scalelle flanked the Torre dei Rosa (the Tower next to the Bar del Duomo and home to the Pio Capponi Civic Museum) and, descending to the Vicolo Sottosusto (between Palazzo Braschi on the right and the foundations of the new Municipium on the left), connected the current Piazza Municipio with the area of Posterula.

 

The Vicolo Sottosusto in an old photograph (Credits: MR Coppola 1984).

 

A district of S. Maria delle Scalelle is attested by some of the documents of the 16th century. However, nothing remains of it or of the church. The bombardments of 1943-44 and the subsequent construction of the current Municipium have erased all traces of this urban layout.

 

 

S. Maria del Tempio

We move just outside the square, near the Vicolo Pertinace.

Here, in Roman times, stood the four-sided arch. Articulated in four large arches straddling the ancient Via Appia, it guaranteed access to the Foro Emiliano from the East.

 

 Reconstruction of the ancient four-sided arch of the Emilian Forum (V. Grossi 2003).

 

The area, starting from the medieval age, was occupied by a series of buildings (you can even see the hinge of a door along the jamb of one of the arches) that survived even in modern times and were swept away by the bombardments of 1943-44.

The medieval quarter was that of the Templum (perhaps because of the proximity of the presumed temple of Vicolo Pertinace) and in its heart, exactly at the crossroads between Vicolo Pertinace and the first stretch of the current Salita dell’Annunziata, was located, since the 9th century AD, S. Maria del Tempio. More than a church, it was a chapel, whose existence is still documented at the beginning of the 16th century. At the beginning of the following century it was transformed into a cellar.

 

The area behind Vicolo Pertinace and the ancient four-sided arch of the Emilian Forum (the remains of which are still visible on the right).

 

S. Domitilla

Just in front of it was the Church of Santa Domitilla.

A plaque still in situ, walled on one of the sides of the present Piazza Santa Domitilla, reminds us that the original chapel was built in 1619 by Pomponio de Magistris, bishop of the city, in the area of the room where the virgins Domitilla, Euphrosyne and Teodora were burned. The place of worship stood, therefore, close to the Porta Albina, the eastern entrance to the ancient city demolished between 1831 and 1850 (its presence is remembered by the still existing funerary lions that in the Middle Ages were placed in front of the door).

 

Piazza Santa Domitilla. In evidence is the plaque walled up still in situ that remembers the location of the original church before its destruction and its transfer to the Palazzo della Bonificazione Pontina.

 

Some works of enlargement and reorganization of the square, however, determined the demolition of the church in the nineteenth century that was rebuilt within the adjacent Palazzo della Bonificazione Pontina.

The new chapel, of neoclassical shape, disappeared, however, in turn. Deconsecrated after 1950, it was purchased by the Municipality of Terracina in 1986. Today it houses the entrance and the bookshop of the new museum of Terracina.

 

The old Chapel of Santa Domitilla in the Palazzo della Bonificazione Pontina (today the bookshop and the entrance of the new museum of Terracina).

 

S. Nicola a Porta Albina

Immediately outside Porta Albina, mentioned above, stood instead San Nicola a Porta Albina, whose presence is attested since the eleventh century AD. The religious building was just outside the door, along the Salita dell’Annunziata.

Still in operation in the fourteenth century AD, disappeared in subsequent centuries. The parish of reference of Borgo dell’Annunziata was, in fact, progressively replaced by the Chiesa dell’Annunziata.

 

One of the funeral lions placed in front of Porta Albina. Behind it stood the Church of San Nicola a Porta Albina.

 

 

 

Posted by Sara Pandozzi

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